Clay County Aggregate Resource Evaluation - Aggregate Potential of Eastern Clay County

This page last updated: 04/06/2007
Metadata created using Minnesota Geographic Metadata Guidelines


Metadata Summary

Originator Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands and Minerals, Mineral Potential Section
Abstract This dataset consists of information about surficial geology and aggregate resource potential, based on geological factors. This work is authorized by Minnesota Statute 84.94.
Browse Graphic View a sample of the data.
Time Period of Content Date 1991
Currentness Reference NAPP aerial photographs from 1991-1992, air photo interpretation 1994-1995, field work 1995.
Access Constraints NA
Use Constraints Acknowledgement of the MN DNR is appreciated in products derived from these data.

These layers do not contain water or wetlands since there are layers available at different levels of accuracy and scale. To most effectively use this dataset, add wetlands and water that are at a scale of 1:24000, if possible. As of 7/2003, it is possible to download both of these layers from http://deli.dnr.state.mn.us
To add 1:24000 layers, look under hydrography, DNR 24K Lakes, DNR 24K Streams, and National Wetlands Inventory polygons.
Distributor Organization Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands and Minerals
Ordering Instructions This and other aggregate resource data layers for Clay County are available for download in a zipfile, claydata.zip, accessible from the MN DNR, Lands and Minerals, Aggregate Mapping web site:
http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/aggregatemaps.html

Maps formatted as .pdf files can be downloaded from the same site: Plate 1. Aggregate Resources, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Text and Figures describing Methodology (clay_pl1.pdf); Plate 2. Aggregate Resources, North Half, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Aggregate Potential and Geologic Factors (clay_pl2.pdf); Plate 3. Aggregate Resources, South Half, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Aggregate Potential and Geologic Factors (clay_pl3.pdf); and Plate 4. Aggregate Resources, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Aggregate Potential (clay_pl4.pdf).

Note: the web page also indicates which other counties have been mapped.
Online Linkage Click here to download data. (See Ordering Instructions above for details.) By clicking here, you agree to the notice in "Distribution Liability" in Section 6 of this metadata.

Full Metadata

Clay County Aggregate Resource Evaluation - Aggregate Potential of Eastern Clay County

Go to Section:
1. Identification Information
2. Data Quality Information
3. Spatial Data Organization Information
4. Spatial Reference Information
5. Entity and Attribute Information
6. Distribution Information
7. Metadata Reference Information

 
Section 1 Identification Information   Top of page
Originator Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands and Minerals, Mineral Potential Section
Title Clay County Aggregate Resource Evaluation - Aggregate Potential of Eastern Clay County
Abstract This dataset consists of information about surficial geology and aggregate resource potential, based on geological factors. This work is authorized by Minnesota Statute 84.94.
Purpose To summarize the aggregate resource potential of the various mapping units.
Time Period of Content Date 1991
Currentness Reference NAPP aerial photographs from 1991-1992, air photo interpretation 1994-1995, field work 1995.
Progress Complete
Maintenance and Update Frequency None planned
Spatial Extent of Data Eastern 18 townships of Clay County, Minnesota
Bounding Coordinates -96.58
-96.15
47.16
46.62
Place Keywords Clay County, Minnesota; eastern 18 townships of county (Barnesville, Cromwell, Eglon, Elkton, Felton, Flowing, Goose Prairie, Hagen, Hawley, Highland Grove, Humboldt, Keene, Parke, Riverton, Skree, Spring Prairie, Tansem, Ulen)
Theme Keywords geoscientificInformation, Aggregate potential, geological characteristics, surficial geology
Theme Keyword Thesaurus ISO 19115 Topic Category
Access Constraints NA
Use Constraints Acknowledgement of the MN DNR is appreciated in products derived from these data.

These layers do not contain water or wetlands since there are layers available at different levels of accuracy and scale. To most effectively use this dataset, add wetlands and water that are at a scale of 1:24000, if possible. As of 7/2003, it is possible to download both of these layers from http://deli.dnr.state.mn.us
To add 1:24000 layers, look under hydrography, DNR 24K Lakes, DNR 24K Streams, and National Wetlands Inventory polygons.
Contact Person Information Dennis Martin (or Renee Johnson), Manager, Mineral Potential Section (or GIS Specialist)
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands and Minerals
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4045
Phone: 651-296-4807
FAX: 651-296-5939
E-mail: dennis.martin@dnr.state.mn.us
Browse Graphic View a sample of the data.
Browse Graphic File Description
Associated Data Sets The County Aggregate Mapping Program dataset for Clay County is included in the file claydata.zip, accessible from the MN DNR Aggregate Mapping web page: http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/aggregatemaps.html

 
Section 2 Data Quality Information Top of full metadata Top of page
Attribute Accuracy The mapping units were compiled onto 1:24,000 USGS topographic maps. These delineations and unit descriptions were field checked and revised. The coverage was created by digitizing the delineations after registering the USGS maps on a digitizing table.
Logical Consistency Overshoots and undershoots were fixed by a variety of techniques, thus the lines have been checked and completed.
Completeness The units were delineated by aerial photograph interpretations. The potential of deposits is based on geologic factors, not economic factors. Generalizations were made, resulting in a product that should be considered reconnaissance level and accurate to a scale of 1:50,000.
Horizontal Positional Accuracy 1:50000
Vertical Positional Accuracy Not applicable.
Lineage These shapefiles are part of Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Minerals Division, Report 306, Aggregate Resource Potential of eastern Clay County, 1997, by JD Lehr, and is part of an ongoing statewide program to provide aggregate resource information to the public. It is based on mapping the Quaternary (i.e., surficial) geology of a county. Once this is done, aggregate potential is determined by examining geologic factors and assigning aggregate potential values to these geologic features.

Aggregate potential for Clay County was originally derived from Quaternary geology features. Lakes were not included as an aggregate resource potential mapping unit, since there are many different versions of lakes, available in digital format, for Clay County. The user can therefore lay their choice of water layers, as well as other types of data, over the aggregate resource potential layer. (Note: for the published map of Clay County, the water layer used for lakes is from MNDOT's Base Map, 1996.) A variety of features on a landscape may affect its value as an aggregate source besides raw or native potential interpreted from surficial geology, such as the presence of water. Users are therefore advised to consider other features, such as water bodies and wetlands, when using the aggregate resource potential layer in any decision-making capacity.

Gravel pit features mapped in this layer represent pits large enough to be recognized as area units on aerial photography (1:40,000 scale) from 1991-1992. The description gravel pit covers both pits currently being mined, as well as areas currently inactive. This distinction between currently active and inactive pits is made explicit in the data attributes AGGPOT, DEP_TYPE, GENET_UNIT, and POTENTIAL. This condition is subject to frequent change as pits open or close in response to aggregate supply and market conditions, making such a distinction of limited value. This information should be used with caution. Other types of gravel pits (those mapped as points rather than polygons [areal features]) can be found in the gp97apt3 shapefile.The user should recognize that this layer represents a snapshot in time of an evolving gravel pit picture in Clay County. Source NAPP air photos are generally dated 1991-1992, and should not be deemed representative of conditions either before or since.

The user should also recognize that the geographic capture and display of geologic features is by nature problematic, for two primary reasons. First, such features extend underground, beyond the view of the interpreter. Second, geologic features tend to occur as zones of transition better represented as areas, rather than as sudden feature changes represented by lines. These factors should be considered when displaying and using these data.
Source Scale Denominator 50000
 
Section 3 Spatial Data Organization Information Top of full metadata Top of page
Native Data Set Environment Arc/INFO 7.2.1 and Arcview 3.1 from ESRI
Geographic Reference for Tabular Data
Spatial Object Type Vector
Vendor Specific Object Types Polygon
Tiling Scheme Clay County
 
Section 4 Spatial Reference Information Top of full metadata Top of page
Horizontal Coordinate Scheme UTM
Ellipsoid GRS80
Horizontal Datum NAD83
Horizontal Units Meters
Distance Resolution
Altitude Datum Not applicable
Depth Datum Not applicable
UTM Zone Number 15E
 
Section 5 Entity and Attribute Information Top of full metadata Top of page
Entity and Attribute Overview The polygons were delineated to represent geological features, geological characteristics, and aggregate potential for sand and gravel, based on geological factors.
Entity and Attribute Detailed Citation ftp://ftp.lmic.state.mn.us/pub/dnr/attributes/agg97py3_att.htm

The relationship between Dep_type and aggregate resource potential is as follows:
HIGH POTENTIAL FOR AGGREGATE DEPOSITS
TYPE B-1: Sand and gravel deposited in near-shore environments of Lake Agassiz. Forms prominent beach ridges. Aggregate deposits are typically thin (10 to 20 feet thick) and narrow, but generally have very little overburden. Gravel percentage is variable, and is generally dominated by fine gravel (#10 mesh to #4 mesh). Percentage of deleterious material, chiefly shale, is generally low.
TYPE O-1: Sand and gravel deposited by glacial meltwater streams confined to a valley. Aggregate deposits in this unit are moderately thick. These deposits generally have very little overburden. Gravel percentage is fairly high, with a mixture of coarse and fine gravel. Percentage of deleterious material, chiefly shale, but including iron oxides, is moderately high. This unit represents part of the outwash valley train in the Hawley area where gravel mining has occurred and subsurface data indicate potential for further development.
TYPE O-3 AND O-4: Sand and gravel deposited by glacial meltwater streams flowing upon stagnant ice. These two units form a collapsed outwash plain in the southeastern part of the county. Aggregate deposits have variable thickness, but are locally quite thick. Overburden thickness is also variable, but is generally minimal. Percent gravel is variable, but is locally quite high, with some areas containing appreciable quantities of coarse gravel. Percentage of deleterious material, chiefly shale, is moderately high. Unit O-3 is differentiated from unit O-4 by a higher density of gravel pits and by subsurface data indicating potential for further development. Aggregate deposits that may occur in unit O-4 will be very similar to Type O-3 deposits, but the probability of finding a deposit in these areas is inferred to be lower.
TYPE SO: Sand and gravel deposited by subglacial meltwater streams where they entered a glacial lake that existed in the Red River Valley prior to Lake Agassiz. These deposits are not expressed as depositional landforms, but occur where the younger sediment has been removed by either stream erosion, or by wave erosion in Lake Agassiz. Aggregate deposits of this type are locally very thick (75 to 100 feet), but may be moderately thick, or absent in places. Overburden thickness is highly variable, ranging from minimal to excessive (greater that 50 feet). Gravel percentage is also highly variable, ranging from high percentage of coarse gravel to entirely sand. Percentage of deleterious material (shale and iron oxides) is generally very low. Potential for these types of deposits is inferred to be somewhat higher in proximity to the erosional features mapped within this unit. This type of deposit represents the highest quality aggregate resource present in the entire region.

MODERATE POTENTIAL FOR AGGREGATE DEPOSITS
TYPE B-2: Sand and gravel deposited in near-shore environments of Lake Agassiz. This unit represents minor beach ridges and, in some cases, off-shore bars composed entirely of sand. Examples of this type of deposit are not common, therefore, supporting data are not abundant. Aggregate deposits are inferred to be rather thin, but generally with minimal overburden. Low percentages of gravel will limit these deposits to certain uses. Percentage of deleterious material is inferred to be low.
TYPE I-1: Sand and gravel deposited by glacial meltwater streams in contact with glacial ice, with some resedimentation by gravity flow processes. This unit occurs as eskers and irregular-shaped hummocks. Aggregate deposits of this type are variable in thickness, but generally of limited lateral extent, with a variable thickness of overburden. Percentage gravel is variable, but locally may be quite high, while in some areas the deposits may be entirely sand. Data on percent deleterious material is lacking, however the quality of these deposits is probably similar to type O deposits.

SLIGHT POTENTIAL FOR AGGREGATE RESOURCES
TYPE B-3: Chiefly sand, with local concentrations of sand and gravel, deposited in near-shore environments of Lake Agassiz. This unit consists of that portion of the shoreline area of Lake Agassiz that is outside the other mapping units (beach ridges for example). These deposits are generally thin. Deposits within this unit generally have little overburden. Percentage of gravel is quite variable, but is generally low to moderate. The gravel fraction may be predominantly fine gravel. Percentage deleterious material is generally low, as in other Type B deposits. Occurring within this unit in the vicinity of Muskoda are meltwater stream deposits similar to Type O-1, which are buried by till and beach-deposited sand and gravel. This unit has potential for other types of buried deposits, especially in the vicinity of shoreline erosional features.
TYPE O-2: Chiefly sand deposited by glacial meltwater streams confined to a valley. This unit occurs in the glacial drainage channels east and south of Hawley. The aggregate potential of this unit will be limited by low percentage of gravel. Gravel-rich zones may occur beneath sand overburden. The percentage of deleterious material in this type of deposit is probably similar to other type O deposits, in other words, with moderate amounts of shale.
TYPE I-2: Sand and gravel deposited by glacial meltwater streams in contact with glacial ice, with some resedimentation by gravity flow processes. Aggregate deposits of this type are variable in thickness and lateral extent. This type of deposit was subsequently buried by later glacial advances and therefore has a variable, but generally pervasive thickness of overburden. Percentage gravel is variable, but locally may be quite high, while in some areas the deposits may be entirely sand. Percent deleterious material is quite variable, but is generally moderate.

LIMITED POTENTIAL FOR AGGREGATE RESOURCES
TYPE LP: Geological units that generally have little or no potential for aggregate resources. In places, includes aggregate deposits either too small or extremely difficult to map. Composed primarily of glacial till and lacustrine silt.
 
Section 6 Distribution Information Top of full metadata Top of page
Publisher Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands and Minerals, Mineral Potential Section
Publication Date 1997
Contact Person Information Dennis Martin
Manager, Mineral Potential Section
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands and Minerals
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4045
Phone: 651-296-4807
FAX: 651-296-5939
E-mail: dennis.martin@dnr.state.mn.us
Distributor's Data Set Identifier Downloadable Data
Distribution Liability The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources makes no representation or warranties, express or implied, with respect to the reuse of data provided herewith, regardless of its format or the means of its transmission. There is no guarantee or representation to the user as to the accuracy, currency, suitability, or reliability of this data for any purpose. The user accepts the data 'as is', and assumes all risks associated with its use. By accepting this data, the user agrees not to transmit this data or provide access to it or any part of it to another party unless the user shall include with the data a copy of this disclaimer. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources assumes no responsibility for actual or consequential damage incurred as a result of any user's reliance on this data.
Transfer Format Name
Transfer Format Version Number
Transfer Size 1.4 mb for data, 9.3 mb for the associated maps
Ordering Instructions This and other aggregate resource data layers for Clay County are available for download in a zipfile, claydata.zip, accessible from the MN DNR, Lands and Minerals, Aggregate Mapping web site:
http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/aggregatemaps.html

Maps formatted as .pdf files can be downloaded from the same site: Plate 1. Aggregate Resources, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Text and Figures describing Methodology (clay_pl1.pdf); Plate 2. Aggregate Resources, North Half, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Aggregate Potential and Geologic Factors (clay_pl2.pdf); Plate 3. Aggregate Resources, South Half, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Aggregate Potential and Geologic Factors (clay_pl3.pdf); and Plate 4. Aggregate Resources, Eastern Clay County, Minnesota: Aggregate Potential (clay_pl4.pdf).

Note: the web page also indicates which other counties have been mapped.
Online Linkage Click here to download data. (See Ordering Instructions above for details.) By clicking here, you agree to the notice in "Distribution Liability" above.
 
Section 7 Metadata Reference Information Top of full metadata Top of page
Metadata Date 04/06/2007
Contact Person Information Renee Johnson, GIS Specialist
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands and Minerals
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4045
Phone: 651-296-4807
FAX: 651-296-5939
E-mail: renee.johnson@dnr.state.mn.us
Metadata Standard Name Minnesota Geographic Metadata Guidelines
Metadata Standard Version 1.2
Metadata Standard Online Linkage http://www.lmic.state.mn.us/gc/stds/metadata.htm


This page last updated: 04/06/2007